Matcha Waffle “Nobu-Style”

Previously, on tastingmenu.wordpress.com –

* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2017/07/31/a-quick-note-on-hazelnuts/
* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2019/11/25/morimoto-tofu-cheesecake/
* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2020/01/05/on-citrus-juice-acidity/

Recently I had acquired a mini waffle maker and then came across a picture at Nobu Manila of matcha waffles with pecans and yuzu whipped cream.  Why couldn’t I take a crack at making this breakfast item?   I could already make whipped cream based on my Tofu Cheesecake experience and I knew how to toast pecans.   All I really needed to do was to come up with a waffle batter.

I knew what the waffle had to look like and what the internal texture was supposed to be from the comment –

https://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/nobu-hotel-caesars-palace-las-vegas?select=gUkj–FFgVrl3wNBFZAbzg

Additionally, I saw from https://www.spot.ph/eatdrink/the-latest-eat-drink/64640/nobu-manila-brunch what the dish should probably look like with the specification for both the pecans and the yuzu whipped cream.

For the whipped cream, I estimated that I was looking at whipping the combination of

cast for the sweet yuzu whipped cream

  • 1/2 cup chilled heavy whipping cream
  • 1 tablespoons sugar (in the spirit of Nobu now, monkfruit sugar)
  • 1/2 tablespoon finely grated lemon peel
  • 1 t + 1/8 t yuzu juice (based on the relative strengths between lemon and yuzu juices)

sweet yuzu juice base

So I started by getting the sweetened yuzu juice together that would make it easier

portioning out the heavy cream

to blend in the heavy cream so that it might make it faster to make the flavored whipped cream.

heavy cream combination whipped at medium speed for about 5 minutes

Once I got that sweet yuzu whipped cream, I got it into a container and off to the refridgerator it went

sweet yuzu whipped cream headed to the refridgerator

So that I could focus on the waffle batter. But what of the waffle batter?  After looking about the web, I settled on:

1 egg
1t + 1/2t baking powder
1 c flour
1/8 t salt
2 T sugar (in the spirit of Nobu now, monkfruit sugar)
1/4 stick melted butter
1 c milk
1/2 t vanilla
1 T matcha powder/cup flour
In organizing this preparation, I thought it would easiest to assemble my dry ingredients

most of the batter ingredients

(salt, flour, monkfruit sweetener, baking powder) before moving on to the wet ingredients.

collecting all the dry ingredients

Once I assembled the dry ingredients, I added in the matcha tea powder.

Adding in the matcha tea powder to the mix

Finally, I only needed to mix together the milk, 1 large egg and vanilla.

portioning out the initial milk for the batter (it turns out an additional 1/2c of milk would be needed for the batter)

 

An egg added to the measuring cup to be whisked (egg just underneath the surface)

 

milk egg, vanilla extract whisked

Once the wet ingredients were blended together, I poured the wet ingredients into the dry.   As originally estimated, the 1/2 cup of milk was NOT enough because the batter was far too stiff.  Adding the extra 1/2 cup

all ingredients combined into the batter

of milk, loosened the batter enough to be pourable into the mini waffle griddle.

1 or 8 matcha waffles cooked about for about 7 minutes

The instructions for the Dash mini waffle maker indicated the cook time to be 5 minutes, but after making several waffles, I determined the cook time to be about 7 minutes.  While the waffles were cooking, I put a handful of pecans (that I toasted the night before) into a ziploc back and lightly crushed them with a meat mallet.

Once I finished making the waffles, I got them onto a plate with some breakfast sausages.  The waffles were topped with a sprinkle of crushed pecans and then a generous scoop of sweet yuzu whipped cream.

matcha waffles “nobu-style”, yuzu whipped cream, chicken breakfast sausages

Tasting the waffle with the pecans. and yuzu whipped cream definitely echoed the “…seriously delicious moist and with the mild green tea flavor “.  The sweet yuzu whipped cream provided a nice contrast with its wonderful floral citrus richness.

As I understand it, the Nobu restaurants menus offer a savory version of the matcha waffle (presumably dropping the sugar/monkfruit sugar) to pair with their chicken karaage for their version of ‘chicken and waffles’ (accompanied by smoked maple ponzu, pecan miso butter, and a sweet and spicy hot sauce [as per a description from Vogue regarding Nobu Shoreditch]).  I could see pairing a savory matcha waffle/chicken karaage with honey bourbon anticucho.

Update

Based on what I’ve been reading recently, it appears some of the matcha waffle accompaniments are ‘yuzu honey’ and ‘pecan miso butter’. See [ https://www.caesars.com/content/dam/nobu/Dining/Menus/clv-nobu-hotel-ird-52019.pdf ].  For the ‘yuzu honey’ I relied on a Korean commerical preparation of Haioreum ‘Honey

yuja base for ‘yuzu honey’

Citron Tea’ which is basically a yuja tea base (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuja_tea ).  I approached the notion of ‘yuzu honey’ using the technique from ( https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/jacques-pepins-cognac-apricot-sauce/ ) by warming 3 T of the yuja with 1 1/2 T of water.

loosening/thinning out the yuja into a ‘syrup’

The pecan miso butter I prepared as a compound butter by blending:

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoons of Nobu-style Saikyo Miso
  • 1/6 cup finely chopped toasted pecans (2 T+2t)

(I will be doing discuss the  pecan miso butter in a future writeup on compound butter)

matcha waffles and chicken sage breakfast sausages with crushed pecans, pecan miso butter, ‘yuzu honey’

My wife tasted the combination and commented the pecan miso butter and ‘yuzu honey’ really worked well together in the overall breakfast offering!

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