Lobster Inaniwa Pasta Salad From Nobu Now

Previously, on tastingmenu,wordpress.com –

* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2011/08/31/seared-salmon-belly-nobu-toro-hagashi-style/

So I wanted something a little bit on the lighter side today that was just as satisfying.  Looking through some of my cookbooks, I noticed the lobster pasta salad from Nobu Now (p. 210).  The ingredient list read:

salt
1 lobster tail (I would get 4 tails totalling about 8oz)
3 1/2 oz inaniwa udon
3 tablespoons yuzu dressing
chopped chives
kinome (sansho sprigs)

8oz lobster tails from Legal Seafoods market

8oz lobster tails from Legal Seafoods market

The salt (a pinch) was for poaching the lobster (out of shell) tailmeat  (I’d probably use 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt/cup of water).  The recipe instructs that the salt water be brought to a boil (and then implicitly lowered for simmering) for cooking the lobster tailmeat for about 7 – 8 minutes. Instead, I thought that I could hop over the Chestnut Hill Legal Seafoods market and get already cooked lobster tailmeat.  After reading through the recipe, I realized how easy this dish was to make.  While Matsuhisa-sama talks about hand shredding the lobster tailmeat, I ended up

Getting the lobster tails ready for the inaniwa salad

Getting the lobster tails ready for the inaniwa salad

having to cut them into bite size pieces, reserving one whole tail to ‘garnish’ the pasta salad.  The inaniwa udon/pasta would take just 4 minutes to boil, drain, shock in cold water (and drain again).  Then it was just a matter of making

fresh batch of yuzu dressing

fresh batch of yuzu dressing

the yuzu dressing and mincing up some chives.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have any access to kinome.

Getting the chives ready

Getting the chives ready

Once I had the yuzu dressing, chives and lobster all set, I went ahead and got about 3-4 oz of the inaniwa pasta into boiling water.

Minced chives, inaniwa udon, cut up lobster

Minced chives, inaniwa udon, cut up lobster

The inaniwa pasta I cooked for about 4 minutes, drained the pasta and shocked it with cold water using the steel colander (that sometimes serves as my china cap for other recipes).

cooked, drained and shocked inaniwa pasta

cooked, drained and shocked inaniwa pasta

Once the I felt the pasta was drained enough, I transferred the inaniwa to a medium sized mixing bowl and added the yuzu dressing.

Adding the yuzu dressing to the inaniwa

Adding the yuzu dressing to the inaniwa

Matsuhisa-sama recommends ‘tossing’ the pasta and the yuzu dressing with chopsticks.

Inaniwa mixed with the yuzu dressing; it *should* look slightly discolored

Inaniwa mixed with the yuzu dressing; it should look slightly discolored

Once the yuzu dressing was well mixed in, I went ahead and added the lobster pieces, mixed again and then carefully turned the contents onto a plate. (Matsuhisa-sama says to plate the pasta first, then place the lobster pieces onto the pasta).  I did this because I wanted the lobster to get a little of the yuzu dressing as well.  I then went ahead and sprinkled several four finger pinchfuls of minced chives about the plate and placed the final whole lobster tail on top.

Lobster Inaniwa Pasta Salad

Lobster Inaniwa Pasta Salad

This was a really nice dish.  If I had to do it again, I think I would add one more tablespoon of the yuzu dressing.  Since I don’t have access to the kinome, I might try sprinkling in a little sansho powder.

 

 

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