Veal Stock

Veal Stock. Well now, Connie Grigsby’s Perfect Additions has closed.  A phone conversation with Strauss Farms/Brand confirmed that they are no longer making their Glace De Veau. So I guess that this was the universe’s way of saying that it was time for me to learn how to make veal stock on my own. One of the starting issues was getting veal bones.  To quote Carole Blymire of carolcookskeller.blogspot.com

…One of the biggest complaints I hear about veal stock is this: “But I don’t know wheeerrre to buyyy veeeeeaaallll boooonnnnnnneeeess.”
To which my reply is: “Get the hell off the computer and TALK TO PEOPLE.”…

Fortunately, I had someone to go to for that conversation – Eddy Boonchuilier in the meat department at Whole Foods in Newtonville, MA. We’d been having this discussion for a couple of months following the departure of Strauss Farms/Brand from the veal stock scene.  Then last week Eddy mentioned that the veal bones had become available/back in season again.

Of course, I had Thomas Keller’s The French Laundry Cookbook that had a recipe for their veal stock (see an online writeup regarding that subject at http://carolcookskeller.blogspot.com/2008/04/veal-stock.html ).  But then there was Michael Ruhlman’s write up at http://ruhlman.com/2011/04/veal-stock-contest .  So I thought to myself, why not use Thomas Keller’s ingredient list as a guide, reduce the amount by a factor of 5 to approximate Michael Ruhlman’s microbatch and see what I could come up with as a result?

Ingredient List –

2 lbs veal bones/osso bucco cut into 3″ lengths (2.4lbs  was ~$14@5.99/lb; probably more for osso bucco)
3.2 oz of tomato paste (about 7 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon)
2.4 oz 1″ mirepoix carrots
3.2 oz 1″ mirepoix leek (white and light green parts only)
1.6 oz 1″ mirepoix onion
1 head of garlic; but use 1/5 of the cloves (about 5 medium size cloves), peeled, 1 grated tablespoon
.3 oz parsley sprig (~8.5g) – about 6 sprigs
.1 oz thyme sprig (~2.8g) – about 6 sprigs
1 bay leaf
3.2 oz tomato cut into 1″ pieces
19 1/4 cups water (4.8 quarts or a little more than a gallon of water for blanching)
~9 1/2 cups + 4t + 3/4t of water (for actually making the stock and again for the remoulliage)

For the cloves of garlic, I went to the store an randomly picked a head of garlic that seemed representative. When I got it home, I peeled it and found that it came to

...a head of garlic...

…a head of garlic…

...now hand peeled...

…now hand peeled…

...that ended being 60g...

…that ended being 60g…

60g of cloves and I wanted 12g – about 5 medium size cloves.

...and we only wanted 1/5th of them

…and we only wanted 1/5th of them

The veal bones/osso bucco would be blanched on 50% max heat for about 1hr 15m (you really do need this amount of time) and then rinsed under cold water immediately.  After the rinsing, the veal bones/osso bucco would be returned to a cleaned oven proof stock pot an simmered in the second amount of water for another 1hr 15m, skimming every 10-15 minutes.

So now, I needed to prepare all my vegetables while the veal bones were blanching, rinsed and then actually

Starting the blanch of the veal bones

Starting the blanch of the veal bones

veal bone after the blanching process

veal bone after the blanching process

blanched veal bones ready to make stock (finally!)

blanched veal bones ready to make stock (finally!)

simmered to make the actual veal stock.

A nice leek for the veal stock...

A nice leek for the veal stock…

...but I just wanted the white and a little light green part

…but I just wanted the white and a little light green part

carrots to be diced up for the stock

carrots to be diced up for the stock

just enough onion for the stock...

just enough onion for the stock…

half of the onion used for the stock

…and diced up

a bit too much ripe tomato...

a bit too much ripe tomato…

but half was enough

but half was enough

All the vegetables for the veal stock

All the vegetables for the veal stock

All the vegetables less the parsley, thyme and bay leaf

All the vegetables less the parsley, thyme and bay leaf

  At that point, I could dissolve in the tomato paste and then add the rest of the aromatics  (including the grated

tomato paste for the veal stock

tomato paste for the veal stock

all 5 garlic cloves grated t 1 tablespoon

all 5 garlic cloves grated to 1 tablespoon

tomato paste dissolved in some of the cooked veal bone liquid

tomato paste dissolved in some of the cooked veal bone liquid to be added to the stock pot before the aromatics

garlic) to the pot and place it into a preheated 190 degree for at least 4 hours.

6 sprigs of parsley

6 sprigs of parsley…

...and 6 bushy sprigs of thyme

…and 6 bushy sprigs of thyme

 

veal bones on first pass stock making process (needed to skim the surface yet again!)

veal bones on first pass stock making process (needed to skim the surface yet again!)

7qt stock pot loaded with all the ingredients

7qt stock pot loaded with all the ingredients

After 4 hours in the oven, I pulled out my 7qt AllClad stockpot.

7qt stock pot in the 190 degree oven

7qt stock pot in the 190 degree oven

I strained the stock into another pot and reserved the solids.  The stock pot was cleaned and the

1st pass of stock making done

1st pass of stock making done

solids strained out

solids strained out

reserved solids were returned to it with about another 9 cups of water.

Setting up for the remoulliage

Setting up for the remoulliage

The pot with the strained stock was placed into an ice filled kitchen sink and then added water to the sink to help chill the stock.

1st pass stock moved to a clean pot and into a sink full of ice...

1st pass stock moved to a clean pot and into a sink full of ice…

...with a bit of water to help speed the chilling process

…with a bit of water to help speed the chilling process

Once the stock was cooled, I strained it again with my fine strainer and put into a glass jar to chill in the refridgerator.

passing the 1st phase stock through the fine strainer...

passing the 1st phase stock through the fine strainer…

...and into a glass container for chilling

…and into a glass container for chilling

The stock pot with the reserved solids and water went back onto 50% max heat to bring it up to a simmer.  Judging from the redness of the first stock, I made a decision to try and do an overnight remoulliage.  Once the remoulliage was at a simmer, I put it into the oven at 190 degrees to cook overnight (about 4-6 hours).

Remoulliage out of the oven...

Remoulliage out of the oven…

The next morning, I pulled the remoulliage from the oven, strained it, and discarded the solids.  I recleaned the 7qt stockpot and combined the strained remoulliage

...and combined with the 1st phase stock

…and combined with the 1st phase stock

and the chilled first stock from the night before and simmered it at 50% max heat on the stove top for nearly 3 hours to reduce it to about 2 quarts.  Interestingly, when I let the combined stocks reduce, the color of the stock went from the reddishness of the first stock to the expected brown that Thomas Keller talks about in the

...the combined stock after stove simmering/reduction

the combined stock after stove simmering/reduction

The French Laundry Cookbook.

straining out the 1st 4 cups of the stock

straining out the 1st 4 cups of the stock

the completed stock

the completed stock!

Next stop/dish for the veal stock is Iron Chef Morimoto’s Hayashi Stew!  His Hayashi Stew recipe calls for veal stock whose recipe/ingredient list from his book is very close to the one listed here.

Resources

Veal bones – Whole Foods, Newtonville, MA

Music To Cook By (chuckle)

Murray Gold – “Next Stop…Everywhere!” ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_m1rPuOwwk – skip the ad) [or should I say, “Next Dish…Everything!”?]

Update (23 Aug 2014)

Upon extracting 2 cups of stock for Iron Chef Morimoto’s Hayashi, I noticed the veal stock was nice and viscous after having being in the refridgerator. That meant there was plenty of gelatin obtained from the veal bones relative to the amount of the liquid in the stock.  Tasting the hayashi met my expectations and convinced me that I’d made the veal stock correctly

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