Domyojiko Mochi With Red Bean Filling

Previously, on tastingmenu.wordpress.com –

https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/nobu-creme-brulee-azuki-red-bean-flavor/

So I was thinking about trying to make Iron Chef Morimoto’s Natto dessert. Yes, NATTO DESSERT. But first, I had to learn how to make domyoji-ko mochi. A thank you to Abbie-chan@Ebisuya in Medford for helping

Thank you Abbie!  She's the customer service representative to go to at Ebisuya, especially if you need to help going back and forth between English and Japanese

Thank you Abbie! She’s the customer service representative to go to at Ebisuya in Medford especially if you need to help going back and forth between English and Japanese

me out to source the domyoji-ko.

The domyoji-ko.

The domyoji-ko.

So to do that, I thought I’d just make a simple version (non-sakura version).  Researching the web, I found – https://en.cookpad.com/recipe/2094552

But that recipe seemed like a  lot, especially since I was learning to make this, so I scaled the recipe down to –

A. For the domyoji (yields 6 portions) [this is probably the smallest workable amount]

Domyoji-ko (coarsely ground Japanese rice flour) 62.5 g  (~2.2 oz)
Sugar 25 g                                        (~7/8 oz)
water 100 ml                                  (~3 3/8 oz of already boiled water, then measured out)
sweet red bean paste  125 g      (~4.4 oz – as it would turn out, it was 3/4t per mochi ball)

measured out domyoji-ko by weight

measured out domyoji-ko by weight

sugar, measured out

sugar, measured out by weight

boiling hot water measured out

boiling hot water measured out

Cooked red bean with equal parts sugar

Cooked red bean with equal parts sugar

Sweeten red bean paste!

Sweetened red bean (puree’d) paste!

A note about the adzuki/azuki/manju – my wife helped out with this by soaking the red beans in water for about 12 hours and then cooking them in our slow-cooker for another 12 hours...

1. Preheat a saucepot to be scalding hot

preheating the sauce pot

preheating the sauce pot

and pour in the boiling water and add the Domyoji-ko once it starts boiling (and then reduce the heat to medium!).

The domyoji-ko added to the boiling hot water

The domyoji-ko added to the boiling hot water

While stirring, continue to heat until all of the moisture has been absorbed by the rice flour.

Domyoji-ko has absorbed the water and the sugar has been mixed in (keep stirring so the domyoji-ko doesn't stick to the bottom of the pot)

Domyoji-ko has absorbed the water and the sugar has been mixed in (keep stirring so the domyoji-ko doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot)

2. Combine the ingredients thoroughly with a wooden spatula or spoon and once the mixture has become plump and soft, stir in the sugar.

3. Once the ingredients have been combined thoroughly, take it off the heat.

4. Lay a damp tea towel (or thick cheesecloth) out in a steamer, turn out the domyoji-ko mixture out onto the towl/cheesecloth, gently wrap the top of the domyojiko with the remaining cloth and steam the mixture for 15

triple layer of cheesecloth laid out in a steamer with cooked domyoji-ko on top and then covered with same cheescloth

triple layer of cheesecloth laid out in a steamer with cooked domyoji-ko on top and then covered with same cheescloth

minutes.

5. After finished steaming, divide it into ~6 equal portions

Domyoji-ko removed from steamer....

Domyoji-ko removed from steamer….

domyoji-ko (slightly shaped)  portioned into 6 sections

domyoji-ko (slightly shaped) portioned into 6 sections

6. Wet your hands with water, roll a portion of the domyoji-ko mixture into a ball, then flatten it as much as you dare.

Getting the domyoji-ko ready to accept the sweetened red bean filling

Getting the domyoji-ko ready to accept the sweetened red bean filling

7. place 3/4 t of red bean paste into balls  and wrap the bean paste in the domyoji-ko mixture, seal the wrap and roll the whole thing into a ball. [repeat steps 5 and 6 until there are no remaining domyoji-ko mixture]

domyoji-ko sealed with the red bean paste within. Starting to roll into mochi balls

domyoji-ko sealed with the red bean paste within. Starting to roll into mochi balls

Upon making the last the mochi balls, I had remaining sweetened red bean paste. I’d probably save the remainder for another application (like maybe topping it on vanilla ice cream…).

completed domyoji-ko

completed domyoji-ko

In tasting the final product, the texture reminded me of the eight treasure rice I had long ago aboard the Jumbo Ferry restaurant (at Aberdeen Harbour, Hong Kong) that was filled with sweetened peanut ‘dust’.  And the domyoji-ko mochi didn’t have that sometime annoying gumminess that I tend  to associate with mochi desserts.  This dish was an eye-opener for my wife in that it wasn’t overpoweringly sweet nor gummy.  This was clearly a dessert treat that we both would look forward to making again.

Resource

Domyoji-ko                           – Ebisuya, Medford, MA

 

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