Nobu Chilean Seabass With Tabbouleh Salsa

Previously, on tastingmenu.wordpress.com –

* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2011/04/20/nobu-chilean-seabass-and-truffles-with-yuzu-soy-butter-sauce
* https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2011/10/28/dashi-marinated-sake-roasted-chilean-seabass

…you may be tempted to eat a lot of it. But I warn you: This is not a main course to fill you up. Scallops are rich food… -Nobu Matsuhisa (http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/24/dining/the-chef-nobu-matsuhisa.html)

So as I was flipping through Nobu: The Cookbook, I came across the grilled scallop/tabbouleh salsa offering (p. 34 & 172). Since Matsuhisa-sama considers scallops a rich food, why not substitute something equally rich like black cod or chilean seabass? So I thought this would be a doable dish, simply baking black cod/chilean seabass and pairing it with the Tabbouleh salsa.  The fish could be seasoned with a bit of salt/pepper and baked at 475 for about 10-12 minutes.  Then it would be just a matter of making the salsa. The online version of the recipe can be found here: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Grilled-Scallops-with-Tabbouleh-Salsa-105870

Salt/pepper for the salsa

Salt/pepper for the salsa

Aji Panca paste for the salsa

Aji Panca paste for the salsa

lemon and yuzu juices for the seasoning

lemon and yuzu juices for the seasoning

grated garlic for the salsa

grated garlic for the salsa

A bit of red onion for the salsa

A bit of red onion for the salsa

Not quite the amount of tomato, but close enough...

Not quite the amount of tomato, but close enough…

Cucumber for the salsa

Cucumber for the salsa

fine dicing the roma tomato

fine dicing the roma tomato

diced up tomato, red onion, cucumbers loaded into a mixing bowl

diced up tomato, red onion, cucumbers loaded into a mixing bowl

a cup of loosely packed parsley leaves

a cup of loosely packed parsley leaves

The 1 cup of finely chopped parsley leaves came to about 4 tablespoons of finely chopped parsley.

mincing up the parsley

mincing up the parsley….

...that yielded 4 tablespoons of minced parsley

…that yielded 4 tablespoons of minced parsley

At that point, it was now just a matter of combining  the seasoning ingredients with the extra virgin olive

adding in the olive oil to the salsa seasonings

adding in the olive oil to the salsa seasonings

oil to add to the salsa.

assembling the tabbouleh salsa

assembling the tabbouleh salsa

Once the salsa was made, I seasoned the chilean seabass with 4:1 salt/pepper mix and got it into a 475 degree preheated countertop oven for about 10-12 minutes.  Once the fish was ready, I spread the salsa across the bottom

Plating the salsa for the baked chilean seabass

Plating the salsa for the baked chilean seabass

of the plates for both my wife and myself and onto the plate the fish went!

Chilean Seabass With Tabbouleh Salsa

Chilean Seabass With Tabbouleh Salsa

As per Matsuhisa-sama’s admonition, I’m glad I made the salsa fresh. During the enjoyment of the meal, I did notice the liquid content of the salsa vegetables beginning to pool at the bottom of the dish.  The salsa added a freshness and slightly spicy (no doubt from the aji panca) bite contrast to the richness of the fish.  All and all, both my wife and I enjoyed the meal.

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