Shishito/Pimientos de Padron Nobu-Style

So my first dinner of the 2013 was going to be steamed monkfish a la Nobu New Style Sashimi.  But what to do to celebrate a little?  Since I brought back some shishito peppers, I thought I might try to do Pimientos de Padron from Nobu West (p. 50-51).  It’s been an appetizer I’ve been wanting to try since seeing the book.  My friend John loves these peppers since he tried Basho’s version of the shishito appetizer here in Boston.   The recipe can be found online at:

http://books.google.com/books?id=wPMvfj0W7isC&lpg=PA51&vq=padron&pg=PA50#v=onepage&q&f=false

 So I picked out about 12 nice sized shishito, washed them and then poked them with a fork.

Shishito Peppers from Mitsuwa, Edgewater, NJ

Shishito Peppers from Mitsuwa, Edgewater, NJ

Poking the peppers with the fork would allow the expanding gases within the cooking pepper to escape so they wouldn’t explode.

Preparing the shishito peppers (poking a few holes so they don't explode while cooking)

Preparing the shishito peppers (poking a few holes so they don’t explode while cooking)

I preheated my countertop oven to 475 degrees F and had cooking tray lined with non-stick aluminum foil.  I loaded the shishito onto the tray, switched the countertop oven’s mode to broil. I had the peppers broil for about 5 minutes (instead of the 1 or 2 as specified in the recipe, since it takes a little time for the upper heating units to get good and hot) on the upper rack so they got a little char on them.

Once they were done, I piled them as a jumble into a little bowl and tossed them with a few 3-fingered pinches of sea salt.  While I could have prepared the shishito on skewers as described in Nobu West, my wife and I found this preparation tasty, nonetheless.

Broiled and tossed in a few 3-fingered pinches of sea salt

Broiled and tossed in a few 3-fingered pinches of sea salt

My wife loved the appetizer and she couldn’t believe how easy it was to prepare.  It was a nice way to start the meal before the main course of steamed monk fish done with nikiri sake soy and heated new style oil.

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