Red Wine Braised Short Ribs With Root Vegetables

When the fall and winter months arrive here in New England, I tend to adjust my cooking towards soups and stews.  One of my favorite dishes to do is red wine braised short ribs.  There are several recipes that I’ve seen over the years. I think the one that appealed to me the most was the one from Ron Siegel of The Ritz Carlton Dining Room in San Francisco (I still remember how wonderful Chef Siegel’s chef’s tasting menu dinners were when I dined there on two occasions).

Here’s the original recipe that I found 6 Jan 2005 at the Republic Of Tea website [  recipe page now gone ] –

Ron Siegel’s Red Wine Braised Short Ribs With Root Vegetables (reproduced with permission of The Republic Of Tea [thank you Marideth Post])

1 litre red wine
4 pounds short ribs
1/2 cup Imperial Republic Tea Oil
1 quart veal stock (may substitute chicken stock)
2 large carrots
1 large leek
2 medium parsnips
1 medium celery root
1 medium yellow onion

To Taste: salt and pepper

1. Preparation

Place red wine in stock pot and simmer 2-3 minutes to burn off alcohol in the wine. Place in a container to cool. Once cool, place short ribs in wine to marinate overnight.

Take short ribs out of marinade, place wine on stove and reduce by half. Season the short ribs with salt and pepper. Get a large fry pan very hot and pour in Imperial Republic Tea Oil (reserve about 2 tablespoons of oil for the vegetables).

Sear the short ribs in the pan. Once seared, place short ribs in the red wine and cover with veal stock.  Bring up to a boil and place in oven for 4 hours until completely tender.  Take the short ribs out of the liquid and set aside. Strain the braising liquid and reduce by half.

Meanwhile, dice up all the root vegetables. Place 2 Tablespoons of Imperial Republic Tea oil in a pan on medium heat, place the vegetables in the pan and cook until tender.

2. Presentation

Place short ribs on a plate with the vegetables and cover with sauce

Yield: 4 servings as a main course

I called the Ritz Carlton, SF on 6 Dec 2010 to clarify a few points.  To begin, the original recipe does not indicate at what oven temperature the ribs are cooked and I was told in the phone conversation that the restaurant cooks its ribs at 350 degrees F for 2 hours.  It was also confirmed that  they do, in fact, use Cabernet Sauvignon as the red wine for this recipe.  They further indicated that reduction should nappe in order to serve as the sauce; and no thickener or roux was added to the braising liquid. It’s important to note is that broth CANNOT  be used.  A bone-based stock must be used here because of the extracted gelatin.  Indeed, Cook’s Illustrated commented on the gelatin issue in their summary by saying, “..We missed the body that the bones’ connective tissue added, so we sprinkled some gelatin into the sauce for suppleness…”.(Jan 2009, see http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/detail.asp?docid=18064) By the way – it is interesting to note that the French Laundry Cookbook also calls for a Cabernet Sauvignon, while Thomas Keller actually uses a Cotes du Rhone in his home version which can be found here –

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/braised-short-ribs-with-whole-grain-mustard.

When I first made this dish, I made a major mistake in the selection of the cabernet sauvignon.  The  wine I selected was a Liberty School cabernet sauvignon (see http://libertyschoolwinery.com/cabernet.php). I hadn’t realized the tannins in the Liberty School cabernet were so strong that when I finally tried the finished short ribs, the taste was not unlike biting into an unripe persimmon. After several more attempts at making this dish, I finally settled on a Chateau Aney Haut Médoc (see http://kermitlynch.com/our_wines/chateau-aney/).  I recently came across a cabernet sauvignon that I wanted to use in making this dish.  The cabernet sauvignon I found was from the Martin Ray Winery ( http://www.securewineshop.com/martinray/customer/product.php?productid=89&cat=1&page=1 ).  This  is the same vinter that provides the Cabernet Sauvignon Matsuhisa Label, Private Selection ( http://www.noburestaurants.com/malibu/menus/drinks/red/) for the Nobu restaurants.  Taste testing the Martin Ray, I noted it had none of the overt tannic effects that I normally associated with bordeaux’s or cabernet’s – exactly what I wanted for the recipe’s marinade/braise.

So, instead of cooking the short ribs in the oven, I chose to prepare the ribs in the pressure cooker,  much like I did with the Ming Tsai pressure cooked short  ribs.

So the night before, here’s what I did…

Place red wine in stock pot and simmer 2-3 minutes to burn off alcohol in the wine. Place in a container to cool.

Matin Ray Cabernet Sauvignon

Burning off the alcohol from the cabernet sauvignon

Once cool, place short ribs in wine to marinate overnight.

Loading the short ribs

Adding the cabernet sauvignon marinade

The original directions said to prepare the vegetables while the shortribs were cooking (Meanwhile, dice up all the root vegetables..). But I chose to prepare the vegetables when I  went to actually make the recipe on Sunday night.

Prepping the carrots

Prepping the parsnips

Dicing up the leek

Chopping up the onion

Peeling the celeriac prior to dicing

All vegetables diced for sautee’ing

Once the vegetable preparations were finished, I went back to the recipe directions and continued with …

Take the short ribs out of marinade, place wine on stove and reduce by half.

The marinade added the pressure cooker for reduction

Season the short ribs with salt and pepper. Get a large fry pan very hot and pour in Imperial Republic Tea Oil (reserve about 2 tablespoons of oil for the vegetables). Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to source the tea oil in time in the Boston area, so I ended up using grapeseed oil for the searing and sautee’ing portions of the recipe.

Seasoning the shortribs

Sear the short ribs in the pan. Once seared, place short ribs in the red wine and cover with veal stock.

Searing the seasoned shortribs

Perfect Additions chicken stock (the recipe indicated 1 quart veal stock (may substitute chicken stock)

Shortribs loaded into the pressure cooker with the stock

Bring up to a boil and place in oven for 4 hours until completely tender.  In this case, I was using the pressure cooker, instead.  So I brought the pot up to pressure and then lowered the heat to 30-40% max power and cooked the ribs for an hour.  Take the short ribs out of the liquid and set aside. Strain the braising liquid and reduce by half.

Braising liquid reducing by half as the sauce (about 30 minutes)

Place 2 Tablespoons of Imperial Republic Tea oil in a pan on medium heat, place the vegetables in the pan and cook until tender.

diced yellow onion and leeks ‘sweated’ down

adding in the diced carrots (cooked for 5 minutes)

Adding in the diced parsnips

adding in the diced celeriac

2. Presentation

Place short ribs on a plate with the vegetables and cover with sauce

Ron Siegel’s Red Wine Braised Shortribs With Root Vegetables

…and I finished the plating by pouring over 5 tablespoons+1 teaspoon of sauce.

Dinner was also accompanied with a small salad of field greens with Bouchon vinaigrette (see https://tastingmenu.wordpress.com/2011/07/28/ron-siegels-salmon-on-shrimp-ravioli-watercress-puree-and-espelette-oil/ ) and a nice crusty baguette from Clear Flour bakery.

Resources

Perfect Additions Chicken Stock – Whole Foods, Newtonville, MA

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